Nfld. & Labrador

'Resign' Dwight Ball posters email fuels fire for even more posters

The recent revelation that Dwight Ball's director of communications inquired about posters calling for the embattled premier's resignation has sparked yet another new poster.

CBC obtained copy of email from Nancy O'Connor to MUN, asking about 'resign' signs

An email sent from Dwight Ball's director of communications, Nancy O'Connor, after discovering the "Resign" signs on the Prince Philip Parkway, has been turned into another poster. (Mark Quinn/CBC)

The recent revelation that Dwight Ball's director of communications inquired about posters calling for the embattled premier's resignation has sparked yet another new poster. 

Plastered on a pole underneath the university centre on Memorial University's St. John's campus, a new poster quotes Nancy O'Connor's email to MUN the day after 240 posters were placed on light poles with the word "resign" superimposed on a picture of Ball.

The poster is in reference to an email CBC obtained through access to information last week.

On June 5, O'Connor wrote to MUN, with the subject line "Posters on poles along parkway."

The body of O'Connor's message read: "Telling DB to resign ... Are these poles belonging to MUN or Power? And are ppl allowed to put posters on them? If not can someone take them down?"

Posters of Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball and the word "resign" have been plastered around Confederation Building for the last several weeks. (CUPE1289/Twitter)

The content of that email has now been turned into another poster, bolstering protesters' calls for Ball to step down.

Within 24 hours of O'Connor's email, in the early morning hours of June 6, a private contractor hired by the province removed many of the signs.

Later that day, the government repeatedly stressed that there was no political involvement in the sign removal, and the decision came from officials in the Department of Transportation and Works.

After the CBC story aired last Thursday, Ball defended his staff, saying O'Connor was just doing her job. 

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