Nfld. & Labrador

Rebuild of Labrador's first snowmobile well underway

The oldest snowmobile in Labrador is one step closer to getting back in running order after nearly a century of it being abandoned in Nain.
Labrador's first snowmobile was brought to Nain in 1927 for a scientific exhibition. (Courtesy of Arctic Museum, Bowdoin College)

The oldest snowmobile in Labrador is one step closer to getting back in running order after nearly a century of it being abandoned in Nain.

Two years ago a team of archeologists in Nunatsiavut uncovered the Ford Model T that was converted to ride through snow on skis and tracks.

The team has been in the process of restoring antique vehicle ever since.

"The engine and transmission are being torn down and are in the process of being rebuilt, so body work has been started," said Jamie Brake, Nunatsiavut archeologist.

"Progress has been great so far."

In 1927, the snowmobile was brought to Nain for a scientific exhibition, and after 15 months on display was abandoned. 

"It looks like a Model-T that has had the front wheels taken off and put on the back with metal tracks wrapped around both sets of wheels on both sides, and skis on the front," Brake said.

The snowmobile is being rebuilt, with different parts of the machine spread across the province for repair. 

Once it's restored, it will be returned to its home in Nain where people will be able to give it a spin and interact with a part of their history.

With files from Leah Balass

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