Nfld. & Labrador

PC Party will 'fight another day', says Paul Davis

Paul Davis addressed PC supporters with a tone of optimism Monday night, despite his party being voted out of government in the Newfoundland and Labrador provincial election.
Paul Davis concedes defeat in the 2015 Newfoundland and Labrador election 1:18

Paul Davis addressed PC supporters with a tone of optimism Monday night, despite his party being voted out of government in the Newfoundland and Labrador provincial election.

"Tonight I acknowledge that the people of the province have made their choice, and the will of the people is always paramount," Davis said from the podium after conceding to Dwight Ball's Liberals.

"I ask you to join me in congratulating not only the Liberals, but also Earle McCurdy and his New Democratic team for a healthy campaign. It's a tremendous thing to step forward and serve your province."

Even with his party's loss, Paul Davis managed to hang on to his own district of Topsail-Paradise, despite recent polls that showed he was trailing behind Liberal Rex Hillier.

Davis said, as an opposition MHA, he wants to make sure the PCs are ready to challenge the Liberals when the next election rolls around four years from now.

"I will lead our steps to rebuild our great party," he said.

"2019 may seem a long way away, but we will be ready to fight another day, and we will be ready to fight another election."

'12 good years'

Following the party's loss Monday, former PC finance chair Tommy Williams — who is also brother of former premier Danny Williams — said the results may be hard to swallow but didn't surprise him.

"I guess I'd be less than honest if I didn't say I was disappointed," he told CBC's Carolyn Stokes after the Liberals were projected as winners. 
Former PC finance chair Tommy Williams says the party was aware that change was coming, but that losing to the Liberals is still a disappointment. (CBC)

"It's been 12 good years, but the polls have indicated that this was the direction we were headed in — but the people of the province have spoken."

Williams said the party has increasingly felt change was coming over the last few years, with the PCs losing a series of byelections and seeing high profile Tories cross the floor to the Liberals.

He said despite the Liberals overwhelming win, he thinks the new government will have their hands full when it comes to actually running the province.

"It's going to be interesting. It's kind of like the dog that caught the car," he said. "Now what are they going to do?"

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