Nfld. & Labrador

Outfitters say industry getting a boost by falling Canadian dollar

While a sinking Canadian dollar can mean harsh times for some businesses, outfitters in Newfoundland and Labrador say their industry might get a boost.
Keith Payne of the Newfoundland and Labrador Outfitters Association says their industry is strong at the moment, and is hoping to keep it that way. (CBC)

While a sinking Canadian dollar can mean harsh times for some businesses, outfitters in Newfoundland and Labrador say their industry might get a boost.

Outfitter Ron Hicks said when the economic recession hit the United States about five or six years ago, outfitting businesses like his felt the blow.

Hicks said people weren't spending the money to come here for moose hunting or salmon fishing.

However, Hicks said things are now changing.
Outfitters in Newfoundland and Labrador say despite a low Canadian dollar, their industry is getting a boost. (CBC)

"Now that our dollar is dropping, that is going to be more favourable and that's good for the visitor, the non-resident, especially the U.S. residents, our clients and ourselves as outfitters," he said.

The Newfoundland and Labrador Outfitters Association hosted members for its annual convention and general meeting Steady Brook this week to talk about their industry.

Association member Keith Payne said the biggest worry is resource numbers — if there is enough in the province to sustain the industry.

"Without our resource, which is the big game animals in the province and the fishing on the island and in Labrador — without a strong resource — we don't have a strong industry. It's the backbone of our industry," said Payne.

Payne said there's been no alarming drop in moose numbers here, with a success rate of 85 per cent or higher when hunting moose, but there's some concern an increase in moose licences could change that.

But for now business is good, and Payne said they're hoping to keep it that way.

Payne said the outfitters business will continue to flourish in this province as long as visitors can be guaranteed their catch, adding that outfitters and the province will have to work together to ensure that happens.

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