Olive-sided flycatcher threatened in N.L.

The olive-sided flycatcher, a medium-sized migratory songbird, was listed Friday as a threatened species under Newfoundland and Labrador's Endangered Species Act.

The olive-sided flycatcher, a medium-sized migratory songbird, was listed Friday as a threatened species under Newfoundland and Labrador's Endangered Species Act.

The provincial government said that means the bird and its habitat will be protected.

"The legal listing and the protection it offers is only the first step in the recovery process," said provincial Environmental Minister Charlene Johnson. "Equally important are the establishment of a recovery team and the preparation of a recovery plan which must occur within two years of the listing of a species as threatened."

Johnson said people who may have an influence on the area where the olive-sided flycatcher lives will be made aware of the change.

"Forest industry representatives and forest managers will be invited to participate in recognition of the role they can play in habitat management, and community involvement in the conservation of this species will also be encouraged," said Johnson in a government news release.

The government's decision is based on a recommendation from the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC).

The olive-sided flycatcher is an olive-grey bird with a white throat, breast patch and belly.

Its song is a distinct loud three-note whistle. It breeds throughout Canada, including Newfoundland and Labrador.

This species winters in Panama and in the Andes Mountains.

Its numbers have been declining over the past 30 years in Canada and in the United States, with habitat loss as the most likely factor.

The total number of plants and animals listed under the province's Endangered Species Act is now 32 — a list that includes 10 endangered species, nine threatened and 13 vulnerable species.

COSEWIC is recognized under the Endangered Species Act as the national body that provides listing advice on species of national conservation concern occurring in the province.