Nfld. & Labrador

NDP, Tom Mulcair nudging up in Atlantic Canada, CRA poll indicates

Atlantic Canadian voters still prefer the Liberal Party of Canada in the upcoming federal election, despite a slight slip to the NDP, according to the newest poll from Corporate Research Associates.
Federal politicians face off during the first leaders' debate Thursday, August 6, 2015 in Toronto. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

Atlantic Canadian voters still prefer the Liberal Party of Canada in the upcoming federal election despite a slight slip to the NDP, according to the newest poll from Corporate Research Associates.

The Conservative Party of Canada is currently in third place for voters in the Atlantic region with 22 per cent of decided voters pledging support. Last quarter, the Conservatives polled at 24 per cent.

The Liberals have dropped three points from 43 to 40 per cent since the last quarter, but still hold strong in first place.

The NDP sit at 33 per cent, a small jump from the 29 per cent voter support shown during the last poll.

Like his party, NDP Leader Tom Mulcair also experienced a jump in support. CRA said decided voter support for Mulcair is at 27 per cent, up from 22 per cent.

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, however, dropped in support to 29 per cent — down from 36 per cent — but still remains the front runner.

Conservative Leader Stephen Harper's popularity stands at 17 per cent. In May, 19 per cent of voters said Harper was the preferred leader. 

Elizabeth May, the Green Party leader, is preferred by seven per cent of decided voters.

One quarter of residents polled said they are either undecided, do not plan on voting or did not want to state a preference.

Meanwhile, two-thirds of the Atlantic Canadian decided voters who were polled said they are dissatisfied with the current federal government.

The results of the CRA poll are based on a sample of 1,521 Atlantic Canadian residents 18 years of age or older.

Polling took place between Aug. 10 and Sept. 2.

CRA said the results are accurate to within plus or minus 2.5 percentage points, 95 out of 100 times. 

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