Nfld. & Labrador

Newfoundland children sell their own books to raise money for Fort McMurray

The flood of generosity that's poured in since a savage wildfire burned through northern Alberta hasn't just been from adults moved by the natural disaster, as was evident this weekend in Paradise.

Among the millions raised, over $260 contributed by group of Paradise kids

Sienna Dillon, Rian Squires, Maggie Green, Hannah Legge and Abby Strowbridge worked for four hours over two days at a book sale on their quiet street, to raise money for victims of the disaster in Fort McMurray. (Submitted by Sean Dillon)

The flood of generosity that's poured in since a savage wildfire burned through northern Alberta hasn't just been from adults moved by the natural disaster, as was evident this weekend in Paradise.

A small group of children got together on a quiet street to sell their own books as a fundraiser for victims of the wildfires that left behind massive destruction in Fort McMurray

Using a lemonade stand, the group of eight-to-11-year-olds set up shop on Islington Place on Saturday and Sunday.

A group of generous children in Paradise raised over $260 for victims of the Fort McMurray wildfires. The group is donating the money to the Red Cross. (Submitted by Sean Dillon)

"They made up their own sign. It was all their own little idea," said Sean Dillon, father of Sienna Dillon, 9.

"Then they just started making signs and pasting it onto the stand that I made up previously."

Sienna Dillon, along with Rian Squires, Maggie Green, Hannah Legge and Abby Strowbridge worked for four hours over two days.

They sold books they didn't read anymore, or ones they'd grown out of, for 50 cents and $1.

"I was all for it, and said if they needed any help I could help them out," Dillon said, adding his daughter, a student at Paradise Elementary, is "really big on helping other people and helping other kids."

Sean Dillon's wife brought the kids to TD Bank with over $260 in coin and bills. It's all being donated to the Red Cross.

After two days of hard work, they were treated to ice cream.​

After reading this story online, a spokesperson with the bank got in touch with CBC News to say they'd like to donate more books to the kids, and that their donations would be matched.

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