Nfld. & Labrador

Controversial heritage property Bryn Mawr sold for $2 million

A historic St. John's home that's been the focus of a battle over heritage status has been sold.
Heritage property Bryn Mawr has been sold for $2 million. (CBC)

A historic St. John's home that's been the focus of a battle over heritage status has been sold.

According to documents obtained by CBC, Bryn Mawr — also known as Baird Cottage — on New Cove Road has been sold, along with its seven and a half acres of land, for $2 million.

Sold to new company affiliated with developer

Registration records indicate that Mildred Steinhauer sold the house in mid-June to New Cove Road Holdings, a new company incorporated less than a week before the sale.

New Cove Road Holdings has the same street address as KMK Capital, the developer with plans for a 28-home project on the site, and its sole director is Kenneth Young, a lawyer with KMK Legal Services, affiliated with KMK Capital.

Young didn't return messages left by CBC.

The City of St. John's bestowed heritage status on the house in May, over the objections of then-owner Steinhauer. The municipal heritage designation halted the requested demolition by Steinhauer as part of the deal with KMK.

In May, Fred Steinhauer, Mildred's son and spokesman for the family, threatened legal action against the city if it designated Bryn Mawr a heritage home.

Coun. Dave Lane said he'd heard there'd been a sale, but city council has not had formal notification of a sale or any potential legal action.

City proceeding with heritage designation

He said city staff are proceeding as planned with work on Bryn Mawr's heritage designation, and the sale could be a positive development.

It's good news if they don't sue, or if that they do, we prevail because we were legally allowed to designate the property, when we did and how we did.- Coun. Dave Lane

"I guess that implies they're looking for ways to use the property with a heritage-designated building on it," he said.

"It's good news if they don't sue, or if that they do, we prevail because we were legally allowed to designate the property when we did and how we did."

The Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador and the Newfoundland Historic Trust have volunteered to meet with heritage experts and the city's planning department to come up with potential uses for the building and the land.

"So if (the owners) are open to a discussion on that, I know that there are volunteers in the community that we can connect them with to have that discussion," said Lane.

Fred Steinhauer declined to comment on the sale.