Nfld. & Labrador·Video

No business like tow business: Hebron platform finished, just waiting on weather

Millions of hours of work has gone into building the Hebron platform, and now Mother Nature is the only thing holding it back from heading out to sea.

Massive structure attached to tow vessels

The $14-billion platform is finished and is now being attached to towing vessels. (Jeremy Eaton/CBC)

Millions of hours of work has gone into building the Hebron platform, and now Mother Nature is the only thing holding it back from heading out to sea. 

Tow vessels are in place at the Bull Arm site surrounding the 750,000-tonne structure, but the sea that has caused delays all winter is holding back it at the moment. 

"We are waiting on the sea ice to clear," said senior project manager Geoff Parker.

"We are still on track for starting drilling in the summer and then producing oil by the end of this year."

Senior project manager Geoff Parker says he's proud of the work done on the Hebron platform. (Jeremy Eaton/CBC)

Parker said there are eight vessels on site attached to the Hebron platform. When the time comes to go, five will be in front pulling it, and three will trail behind providing steering for the 350-kilometre journey to the Hebron field. 

"Once we are out at the field at the installation site those vessels will circle the platform and hold it in place as we set it down on the seabed," said Parker. 

Eight tow vessels will take part in the massive moving project. (Jeremy Eaton/CBC)

The $14-billion platform will be able to produce 150,000 barrels of oil per day at peak production.

"This is an engineering marvel," Parker said.

"So many people, particularly here in Newfoundland and Labrador, have contributed to the success of this."

Senior project manager said it's just waiting on sea ice to clear up before the big move. 1:36