Nfld. & Labrador

Harvard students creating new designs for rural Newfoundland

A group of architecture students from Harvard University are in rural Newfoundland communities this week, helping the towns develop innovative new designs and expansions.
Fourteen architecture students from Harvard University are in Harbour Grace this week, staying at the Rose Manor Bed and Breakfast. (Gordon Stone)

A group of architecture students from Harvard University are in rural Newfoundland communities this week, helping the towns develop innovative new designs and expansions.

The 14 Masters students are in Harbour Grace, Twilingate, and Port Union as part of a program called Outports in Transition.

While in Newfoundland, they will study the towns, have public discussions, meet with town councillors, and try to figure out fresh things that can be done to benefit the communities.

"I'd like to think that these architectural students are going to come in and look at some of our potential places here in the harbour and around the town, and see it through those new eyes," said Harbour Grace councillor Gordon Stone.

Councillor Gordon Stone said the Admiral's Marina in Harbour Grace is a prime example of how a fresh set of eyes can see great new design opportunities. (Gordon Stone)

Stone said that opportunities for growth can sometimes be overlooked by those who have been in the region for a long time.

He mentioned the Admiral's Marina in Harbour Grace, which was simply a small salt water pond for years before it was made into a thriving harbour.

"Here's an idea now of something that went on for years that nobody saw the potential," he said.

"A group saw it with fresh eyes, and lo and behold, here it is."

The students will help the town councils put together comprehensive plans for the towns, which will include architectural designs of proposed projects.

"Having a set of architectural drawings that could back up some of the things that you hope to develop, that certainly helps you when you go looking for funding or you're trying to convince someone that your idea's a good one," said Stone.

The students are in Newfoundland for one week.

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