Nfld. & Labrador

Grand Falls-Windsor teens carving hobby into jobs with woodworking company

Two teenage friends in Grand Falls-Windsor have turned a hobby into a home business this winter, churning out wooden goods in time for Christmas.

14-year-olds selling products for Christmas gifts

Cole Stagg and Jacob Moore have created a small business out of their love for woodworking. (Submitted)

Two teenage friends in Grand Falls-Windsor have turned a hobby into a home business this winter, churning out wooden goods in time for Christmas.

Cole Stagg and Jacob Moore are typical 14-year-old kids, playing sports and spending their spare time in Cole's shed.

But what they do in the shed — making custom wood products — has been generating some money this month.

"We make bowls and we just made some candle centre pieces from half a log," Cole said. "We can make a lot of stuff. We have all the tools."

Cole Stagg learned woodworking skills from his father at a very young age. (Submitted)

Ever since he could walk, Cole was in the shed with his father helping out with woodworking projects. When he was 10, he got his first lathe and started making various things for people in his family.

"For many years, I've been making ornaments and different gifts and cutting boards for people for Christmas gifts," he said. "It'll last a lifetime, the memories."

At the start of this year, Cole recruited the help of his friend Jacob to join him in the shed.

"I just kind of picked it up after him," Jacob said. "He taught me some stuff."

Sitting around the dinner table one night, Cole's mom suggested the boys should monetize the amount of time they spent in the shed.

Thus, CJ Woodworking was born.

At the start of this year, Cole recruited the help of his friend Jacob Moore to join him in the shed. (Submitted)

So far this year, the boys have started small with sales to their friends and family members. They have plans to grow the business, however, and hopefully set themselves up for the future.

"We want to grow and develop it and it's also a great way to pay for secondary education," Cole said.

"Well, I don't know about that," Jacob chuckled. "I just need a bit of money on the side."

The boys hope to keep their business alive throughout high school and spread the allure of their handmade goods.

"It's one of a kind," Cole said of the products they make. "You can make a lot that look alike, but they're not exactly the same. You put your time and effort into making it."

With files from Central Morning Show

now