Nfld. & Labrador

Forest fighting services welcome cool, damp July weather

Despite the grumbling of sun-lovers in the province, the wet and cold weather is actually welcome for the province's fire fighting services.
A water bomber at an airstrip. near Happy Valley-Goose Bay (Mike Power/CBC)

Despite the grumbling of sun-lovers in the province, the wet and cold weather in Newfoundland and Labrador this July is actually welcome for the province's fire fighting services.

Fog and temperatures that have dipped into the single digits means things are not heating up on the ground, and that's just the way the Department of Natural Resources likes it.

"From a fire perspective, we love this weather," said manager Eric Young.

"It's been cool and low temperatures and a little bit of precipitation."

An uneventful month

While it's been an easier season for the service this year, the actual numbers show that there have actually been more recorded forest fires in 2015 than at this same point last year.

However for the month of July, the numbers are much lower this season.

"Last year, we had about 32 fires up to this date, and this year we're down to about nine fires," said Young.

"It has to do with early spring and the snow melting faster than usual but for the month of July it is much lower."

As well, Young said the fires that have been reported have been small in nature, which he said should save the government some money.

"When we actually have large fires that's when we start accumulating expenses and costs," he said.

"Fortunately this year, we haven't had any large project fires here on the island or in Labrador, so that should equate for some savings for the province."

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