Nfld. & Labrador

Drunk-driving simulator revealed at NLC's 'Responsible Choices'

If you think you can drive after three or four drinks, there is a way to safely learn how wrong you are.

Drunk driving simulator revealed in St. John's

7 years ago
Duration 2:15
The Newfoundland and Labrador Liquor Corporation (NLC) rolled out a program called "Responsible Choices" at the Re/Max Centre in St. John's on Wednesday. High school students, police and various groups were at the event, taking part in an interactive experience to learn the dangers of drinking and driving.

If you think you can drive after three or four drinks, there's a way to safely learn how wrong you are. 

The Newfoundland and Labrador Liquor Corporation (NLC) is rolling out its Responsible Choices program aimed at teaching the dangers of drinking and driving.

High school students and police representatives put on special goggles Wednesday to simulate the effects of alcohol, and then tried to steer a pedal cart through a closed course. 

Most participants, including CBC's Zach Goudie, couldn't steer their way around the first corner. 

Sean Ryan, NLC's regulatory compliance director, wants people to remember the simulation so they never have to try the real thing.

"It's the closest thing that we could do to bring people to reality in terms of experiential based training," he said.

"It's the old issue, if you're having fun while you're learning, your retention is that much better."

The program is touring around the province this summer. The NLC is also taking requests from groups that would like the program to come to them.

Check out our video player to see the the simulator, and Zach Goudie, in action.

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