Nfld. & Labrador

Divisive Temperance Street condo development up for a vote Monday

A controversial development in downtown St. John's that critics say will cause traffic congestion and interrupt the view plane for the area is expected to be voted on by city council during Monday's meeting.

City staff recommending approval of St. John's waterfront project

If approved, Harbourside Condominiums would have starting prices over $300,000. (CBC)

A controversial development in downtown St. John's that critics say will cause traffic congestion and interrupt the view plane for the area is expected to be voted on by city council during Monday's meeting.

City staff are recommending approval of the project on Temperance Street, which would sit on the edge of the Signal Hill and Battery neighbourhoods. 

But one city councillor, Jonathan Galgay, says he will vote against it.

"This perhaps is the last prime piece of real estate in that area of the downtown, and to put something so large there will certainly have an impact on the view plane for the entire area," said Galgay.

The building will stand 15-metres over the street, and many residents have complained that it will block their view of the harbour.

Galgay opposes the height of the building, and believes it could also cause headaches for motorists.

"I have no doubt that that will add to the already congested and most difficult to use intersection in the city," he said.

Opponents have also criticized the design of the building, saying it doesn't fit with the character of the neighbourhood.

Nolan Hall, which is known for building developments in downtown St. John's, is behind the project, which is called Harbourside Condominiums.

Company officials say the proposal will not block the views of people who live directly above the road, and that the original plan envisioned a taller structure.

Kevin Hall has also said the project adheres to city and heritage standards.​

The plan is the second one in five years aimed at turning the vacant lot into condos.

With files from Randal Wheeler

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