Nfld. & Labrador

CNA media programs moving from Stephenville to St. John's

The College of the North Atlantic hopes a shake-up will boost enrolment in some media arts programs, while allowing more students in the heavy equipment operators program in Stephenville.
The College of the North Atlantic Bay St. George campus will be losing its media arts programs, but the presidents says it will be gaining more students in the heavy equipment trades programs. (Google Maps)

The College of the North Atlantic hopes a shake-up in program locations will boost enrolment in some media arts programs while allowing more room its for heavy equipment operators program in Stephenville.

The college's music industry and performance, recording arts, video game design, graphic design and graphic communication and journalism courses from the Bay St. George campus in Stephenville to St. John's.

CNA President Ann Marie Vaughan says a recent program review suggested certain program would do better at the Prince Philip Drive location.

"Students were telling us that students really need to be networked throughout the program to help them in their career," she told CBC's Corner Brook Morning Show.

"It was the students that really told us, as well as employers."

Losing programs, but gaining numbers

Recent research done by the college showed that three-quarters of media arts applicants come from the northeast Avalon, and that there were declining numbers in those programs in the Bay St. George area.

CNA President Ann Marie Vaughan says the college is responding to student and employer requests with the program location change. (CBC)

In addition to moving the media programs to St. John's, the college's campus in Stephenville will expand its heavy equipment industrial trades programs.

Vaughan says there's big demand for those courses and now the college will be able to train about 250 more students a year in Bay St. George.

She insists the program change will be beneficial for both St. John's and Newfoundland's west coast.

"The numbers lost in the arts programs are less than 50 students, in fact it would probably be about 35 to 40 students," she said.

"There will be a significant net gain to the community for the programs that will be coming in."

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