Nfld. & Labrador

Churchill Falls makes curbside recycling mandatory

The town plans to tag bags of garbage containing recyclable material, and after a few tags are issued to the same individuals, their waste won't be picked up.

Paper recyclables will be shipped out of town

Churchill Falls has started a new mandatory curbside paper and cardboard pickup program. (CBC)

A town in Labrador has started a new curbside paper and cardboard recycling pickup — and it's mandatory.

Since October, residents have been asked to put their garbage out in clear bags, and if there is recyclable matter in the bags, the town will issue the household a tag. After a few tags, the town will no longer pick up the garbage.

It's a benefit to our future generations.-Tammy Park

"It's nothing new in a lot of other parts of the country. Newfoundland, I think, is probably a little bit behind in that respect," said Steve Power, manager of town operations. 

For more than a year there has been curbside pickup for beverage containers, but the town is expanding curbside pickup following a solid waste study.

In the study, Nalcor determined that fibre was one of the largest producers of waste and wanted to divert those materials from the landfill. 

Town of Churchill Falls operations manager Steve Power

There is no recycling depot for paper in Labrador so fibre waste has to be separated by residents and the town will ship it out of the area. 

The recycling will be shipped out on empty trucks that came in full, which the town says will save money and benefit the program's cost-neutral plan.

The town has rented three balers from a company in Ontario. The baling should start this week as the equipment has been installed and the workers have received proper training.

"People want to do good for the environment," said Power. "It hasn't been that difficult to get people on board."

The town has rented three balers from a company in Ontario. They have since been installed and the baling should start this week. (CBC)

Churchill Falls resident Tammy Park said she has no problem abiding by the new recycling rules. 

"I thought it was a wonderful thing to help reduce our waste in our landfills," she said.

In fact, Park said, she wants the provincial government to take it further. 

"I think that the province should implement something that would help the communities to recycle because it's a benefit to everybody.… It's a benefit to our future generations."

Read more from CBC Newfoundland and Labrador

With files from Rebecca Martel

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