Nfld. & Labrador

Child support laws go too far, says divorced parent

A St. John's man says a provincial law aimed at dead-beat fathers is excessive.

A St. John's man says a provincial law aimed at dead-beat fathers is excessive.

Alastair Collis said it’s unacceptable that authorities have garnisheed his mother's bank account.

"Why would they attack a 90-year-old woman? It's elder abuse," he told CBC News.

"They just can't go just stopping your driver's licence, your passports, your account and all that. And now, I don't care what they do to me, they can throw me in jail, I don't care but you don't touch my mother."

Newfoundland and Labrador’s director of support enforcement has declared Collis in default of payments and garnisheed his bank account and because Collis’s name is also on his mother's account, that has been garnisheed as well.

Once a court orders a divorced parent to pay support for children, the payments are made to the director of support enforcement, who then ensures the payments are passed on to the children.

Collis refuses to go through the director and said he doesn't see why he should.

He said he’s a good father who regularly makes payments to his two teen-aged daughters in Toronto.

Collis is calling on all provincial party leaders to study child-support laws and have them rewritten.

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