Admiralty House orders construction stop after a new discovery under its own parking lot

The Admiralty House Communications Museum in Mount Pearl has stopped construction on its parking lot after unearthing what appear to be concrete structures.

Unknown concrete structure halts construction in Mount Pearl

Admiralty House Communications Museum manager Sarah Wade says the museum, in partnership with the provincial archeology office, is working to figure out just exactly what they've unearthed under the parking lot at the museum. (Todd O'Brien/CBC)

The Admiralty House Communications Museum in Mount Pearl has stopped construction on its parking lot after unearthing what appear to be concrete structures underneath. 

Staff initially thought the concrete was involved with their septic system, but upon closer inspection they discovered copper wires and wood as well.

"Right now we're just trying to see if there's a door to this to try to figure out what it is. We don't know if it's a solid structure or if it's empty," Sarah Wade, manager of the Admiralty House Communications Museum, told CBC News.

"We're working closely with the provincial archeology office to go about about this in proper methods and just to make sure we're all looking after it in case it has any historical significance."

The museum doesn't know what has been found, but has theories that the structure could have been used as a support for a tower when the location was a Marconi wireless telegraph station.

The Admiralty House Communications Museum in Mount Pearl halted construction on their parking lot on Monday after the discovery of unknown concrete structures below it. (Admiralty House Communications Museum/Twitter)

"There has been a number of theories passed around," Wade said.

"Your mind starts racing because it's just so exciting when you uncover these things and you want the answers and you want the story."

Wade added the museum will be working with the city, the construction company and the provincial archeology office to make sure the site is thoroughly investigated before moving on with development plans. 

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