New Brunswick

Waterloo Row subdivision gets Fredericton council approval

The controversial subdivision of a property on historic Waterloo Row was approved by Fredericton City Council at its Monday meeting.

City council vote clears hurdle for new home to be built in heritage area along riverfront street

The owners of 58 Waterloo Row are proposing to build a second house on their property, but neighbours say the historical integrity of the area is at stake. (Julianne Hazlewood/CBC)

The controversial subdivision of a property on historic Waterloo Row was approved by Fredericton council at its Monday meeting.

City council voted 4-2 to allow homeowners Ayten and Marc Kranat to subdivide their lot at 58 Waterloo Row, choosing to take eight per cent of the value of the land in cash in lieu of public land.

The Kranets want to build another home on their lot and while council's vote on Monday doesn't give them the final approval to do so, it does move their application forward.

Hundreds of residents have a signed a petition against the Kranets' proposal.

Coun. Kate Rogers represents the area and voted against the motion.

"I refuse to accept that as stewards of this city we can't vote against the execution of a subdivision bylaw that we have acknowledged by two previous motions to council to be flawed in the preservation areas," said Rogers.

It's wrong for the heritage preservation area and it's wrong for the city.- Coun. Kate Rogers

"It's wrong for the heritage preservation area and it's wrong for the city."

The Kranats are now required to submit a final subdivision plan and it will be left to the city's development officer to give the final approval.

Coun. John MacDermid, who sits on the city's planning advisory committee, says there is a disconnect between the city's zoning and heritage bylaws.

"I look at this and I think, we actually may not be able to completely prevent this in the future because of the laws the province of New Brunswick has left us to deal with," said MacDermid. 

"I'm hopeful something good will come out of this and that in the future, that clearly all those voices that want to see a change in the way their heritage is preserved come forward. But I'm not going to wait on that."

City staff has been asked by council to review the zoning and heritage bylaws.

The city's preservation review board previously voted in favour of the modern design for the proposed new house by a 5-4 margin.

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