New Brunswick

Vitalité Health Network better prepared for second wave, says CEO

The Vitalité Health Network is more prepared for COVID-19 than it was six months ago, according to network president and CEO Gilles Lanteigne.

Gilles Lanteigne said hospitals are more prepared to handle the virus while still keeping up activity

Gilles Lanteigne, president and CEO of Vitalité Health Network, said hospitals will be able to respond more easily to another outbreak. (Michel Corriveau/Radio-Canada)

 The Vitalité Health Network is more prepared for COVID-19 than it was six months ago, according to network president and CEO Gilles Lanteigne.

"I would say that it's much more refined in the way that we were able to establish all proper linkages with our partners and work in a more integrated way with Horizon and the ministry," said Gilles Lanteigne.

The Vitalité Health Network had its board of directors meeting Tuesday afternoon, where board members heard a presentation on how the network has been able to handle the pandemic. 

A survey and series of interviews with Vitalité staff found the the network handled the first wave well, said presenter Gisele Beaulieu. 

People surveyed also said internal communication could improve as Vitalité looks ahead at a second wave. There was also a desire for more mental health services. 

Second wave

Dr. Jennifer Russell, the province's chief medical officer of health, said New Brunswick's two new cases are in a special care home in Moncton. (Government of New Brunswick file photo)

Case numbers remain low in New Brunswick. Chief medical officer of health Jennifer Russell confirmed two new cases in the province on Tuesday. Both are in a special care home in Moncton.

But numbers across the country are rising.

On Tuesday, Quebec reported 1,364 new cases of COVID-19, which is the highest single-day total reported in the province. Ontario reported 548 new cases Tuesday and Manitoba announced 56 new cases. 

But Lanteigne is confident hospitals would be able to better handle a second wave.

"The difference I would say this time is that we are prepared but at the same time we are able to increase the level of activities in the hospital," said Lanteigne after the meeting. 

Lanteigne said if there is a second wave, hospitals will be able to respond more quickly. 

"We know that if we have to do a reset we can do it probably more easily than the first time," he said.

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