New Brunswick

Sale of flavoured vaping products banned in New Brunswick starting Wednesday

A ban on the sale of flavoured vaping products will take effect in New Brunswick on Sept. 1.

Ban comes after bill received unanimous support in legislature

In a Health Canada survey, young people said flavour and smell were their main reasons for trying vaping products. (Steven Senne/The Associated Press)

The government of New Brunswick has set a date for a ban on the sale of flavoured vaping products.

As of Wednesday, retailers will only be allowed to sell tobacco-flavoured vaping products, putting an end to the sale of those with flavours such as bubble gum, chocolate, cotton candy or mango, the government said in a news release Monday.

The province said the ban is aimed at curbing a rise in teen vaping, and cites a Health Canada survey in which young people said flavour and smell were their main reasons for trying those products.

"Vaping has been marketed to adults as a safer alternative to cigarettes," the news release says. "However, most flavoured products still contain nicotine.

"Some of these products have nicotine levels equal to or higher than the amount found in cigarettes."

Last fall, the Opposition Liberals introduced Bill 17, a ban on the sale of flavoured vaping products, in the legislature. It received unanimous support across parties, and in May passed second reading.

The move was met with criticism from the Vaping Trade Association, which said the ban would cause the loss of 200 jobs and the closure of dozens of small family-owned businesses.

Health Canada said vaping poses a risk of nicotine dependence, which can affect memory and concentration. It is also known to alter teen brain development and may reduce impulse control and cause cognitive behavioural problems.

"We need to give our teens the best possible start in life," New Brunswick Health Minister Dorothy Shephard said in The release Monday.

"We need to create an environment where kids are not constantly being exposed to vaping. And we need to support those young people who are already struggling with addiction by providing the resources they need to quit."

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