New Brunswick

No more train whistles at two city crossings in Saint John

The blaring of train whistles will no longer jar residents who live near railway crossings at Rothesay Avenue and Thorne Avenue. Starting on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 12:01 a.m., train engineers will no longer sound the engine whistle, except in case of emergency.

A city council motion passed in August, banning the whistles, comes into effect

Train whistles will no longer be sounded at two east side saint John railway crossings. (CBC)
Traffic at this crossing on Rothesay Avenue, and a crossing on Thorne Avenue, has increased dramatically since a new crude oil rail terminal opened near the Irving Oil refinery in 2012. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
The blaring of train whistles will no longer jar residents who live near railway crossings at Rothesay Avenue and Thorne Avenue.

Starting on Saturday, Oct. 24 at 12:01 a.m., train engineers will no longer sound the engine whistle, except in case of emergency.

Train whistles will no longer sound at the Thorne Avenue railway crossing. (Matthew Bingley/CBC)
Traffic on the two crossings has increased dramatically since a new crude oil rail terminal opened near the Irving Oil refinery in 2012.  

"It has contributed to a lot of sleepless nights," said local resident Sean Flynn

Speaking to CBC News back in August, Flynn said he was losing patience.

"I feel like I'm in the seventh circle of hell," said Flynn.

City councillor Gerry Lowe lobbied hard to get the whistles banned. He told CBC News the trains sound their horns three times before crossing each of the roads, which are just a block apart.  

Gates, lights, and warning bells will continue to operate at the crossings, and signage will be installed.

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