New Brunswick

Tina Fontaine remembered in blanket vigil in Fredericton

About 50 people gathered in front of City Hall in Fredericton on Monday evening and wrapped themselves in blankets as a sign of solidarity and support for Tina Fontaine.

Wolastoq Grand Chief Ron Tremblay calls for justice reform

About 50 people who gathered in Fredericton to remember Tina Fontaine wrapped themselves in blankets to show solidarity and support. (Ed Hunter/CBC)

About 50 people gathered in front of City Hall in Fredericton on Monday evening and wrapped themselves in blankets as a sign of solidarity and support for Tina Fontaine. 

Fontaine was a 15-year-old Indigenous girl from Sagkeeng First Nation, north of Winnipeg. Her body was pulled from Winnipeg's Red River in August 2014. Raymond Joseph Cormier was charged later that year with second-degree murder but was found not guilty earlier this month. 

Wolastoq Grand Chief Ron Tremblay said the blankets people were asked to bring to the vigil symbolized strength and love. He added the vigil was meant to show Fontaine's family that people on the East Coast support them. 

Wolastoq Grand Chief Ron Tremblay speaks at a vigil for Fontaine at City Hall on Monday. (Ed Hunter/CBC)

"We're asking the Canadian government to show some sort of justice," he said.

Tremblay said as the traditional grand chief it's his responsibility to show solidarity and support over concerns of injustice for Indigenous people.

Organizers said the vigil was meant to show Fontaine's family that people on the East Coast support them. (Ed Hunter/CBC)

"There needs to be some sort of justice reform."

The vigil included speeches  along with traditional drumming and singing.

With files from Gary Moore

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