New Brunswick

Ted Nugent hunts with charged Plaster Rock camp owners

Despite the controversy, American rocker Ted Nugent claims to have hunted with a New Brunswick outfitter that is facing over 60 charges related to illegal hunting and illegal possession of animal parts.

Owner Daniel Dyer is charged with the illegal possession of black bear parts

"At Lawrence Dyer & Sons in New Brunswick Canada," Nugent posted to Facebook June 23. "With Danny, Dave, Chris and Kim & team for THE best black bear camp anywhere! Rugsteaks are flowing baby!" (Facebook)

Despite the controversy, American rocker Ted Nugent claims to have hunted with a New Brunswick outfitter that is facing over 60 charges related to illegal hunting and illegal possession of animal parts.

Nugent posted several photos showcasing dead bears on his Facebook account stating he'd recently been on a hunting trip in Plaster Rock.

"At Lawrence Dyer & Sons in New Brunswick Canada," Nugent posted on June 23rd. "With Danny, Dave, Chris and Kim & team for THE best black bear camp anywhere! Rugsteaks are flowing baby!"

Daniel, Christopher, and Kimberly Dyer are three of five people charged under the Fish and Wildlife Act in relation to a seizure of illegal animal parts from the Lawrence Dyer & Sons outfitters lodge near Plaster Rock in January 2015.

Owner Daniel Dyer is charged with the illegal possession of black bear gallbladders and black baculum, the bone found in the bears' penis, as well as the meat, carcasses, and heads of moose and deer.

Despite the charges, the business continues to operate.

Hunting legal

Guided bear hunts were offered during this spring bear season due to the court date being pushed back twice from the original posting of April 21.

They will now resume in Grand Falls Provincial court on August 25.

Some local hunters say allowing those charged with major offences to push back court dates and continue to hunt is wrong.

"I think if you've got that many serious charges against you and if it's just a deliberate delaying tactic be able to profit, that should not be allowed," says local hunter Ron Currie. "That's not fair."

According to the Department of Natural Resources hunting while charged is legal.

"You are not guilty until you are found guilty," said conservation enforcer Shawn Farrell. "You can buy a licence. Until you are found guilty, you can hunt." 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Shane Fowler

Reporter

Shane Fowler has been a CBC journalist based in Fredericton since 2013.

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