New Brunswick

Sussex Tim Hortons manager who spied on employee in bathroom gets probation

A former Tim Hortons manager in Sussex has been put on probation for 18 months after he admitted to filming a teenage employee change.

Kim Stanley Wong, 44, pleaded guilty to voyeurism on Dec. 3

Kim Stanley Wong admitted to filming a teenage employee change at a Sussex Tim Hortons. (Graham Thompson/CBC)

A former Sussex Tim Hortons manager has been put on probation for 18 months after he admitted to filming a teenage employee change.

Kim Stanley Wong, 44, pleaded guilty to voyeurism on Dec. 3, 2020. 

Judge Andrew LeMesurier handed down an 18-month suspended sentence on Tuesday, ordering Wong to keep the peace, attend counselling, have no contact with the victim or her family or be anywhere near where she lives or is employed.

He must also pay $750 to the Coverdale Centre for Women. If he breaks probation, he could be given a tougher sentence.

Wong will also be added to the sex-offender registry.

LeMesurier said the crime was "a disturbing breach of a trust of a young employee in a small community."

"This would have been the talk of Sussex."

However, LeMesurier said Wong is attending counselling and has gotten another job where he can work from home, which works in his favour.

"I don't think a jail sentence would help anyone right now," the judge said.

Defence lawyer Maria Powell said police found no evidence on Wong's phone that he had filmed anyone else.

Setting up a phone in the washroom

An agreed statement of fact said the victim was going into the staff bathroom to change before her shift on Nov. 29, 2019, when Wong asked her to wait while he fixed a light bulb.

When she was getting changed she was looking around and noticed a phone on a shelf, with the camera aimed at her.

The employee picked up the cell phone and realized it was recording her. She stopped the recording and checked to see what it captured. At the beginning of the video she saw Wong adjusting the phone after placing it on the shelf, then saw herself changing.

She also found pictures of him and his family on the phone, the statement says.

She took this information to her supervisor, who then went to the second manager of the coffee shop, Wong's wife.

Crown prosecutor Jim McAvity said the employee and supervisor explained what was going on and "didn't get the very best of receptions."

The employee then went home, told her parents and went to the police. Police searched Wong's phone and "found what was described exactly," McAvity said.

The victim's name and identity are under a publication ban. She was in court but did not read her victim impact statement out loud. LeMesurier read a small excerpt out loud when handing down his sentence.

"Every time I have to use a public washroom, I first check it for any devices that are recording," he read.

"My anxiety spikes every time I have to use a public washroom. I try not to do anything that may embarrass me just in case I'm being recorded."

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