New Brunswick

New Brunswick loses 3,900 jobs in April, labour force report shows

New Brunswick's economy, lost 3,900 jobs in April, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

Statistics Canada's monthly report shows 6,400 full-time jobs were lost, but 2,500 part-time jobs were created

The labour force report, which was released on Friday morning, showed the unemployment rate sitting at eight per cent. (Matt York/Associated Press)

New Brunswick's economy lost 3,900 jobs in April, going against a brighter picture of the labour market in the country as a whole, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

The province lost 6,400 full-time jobs but added 2,500 part-time jobs last month. 

The labour force report, which was released Friday morning, showed the unemployment rate was at eight per cent, up 0.1 per cent from this time last year.

The rate in March was 7.9 per cent. 

Meanwhile, Canada's economy reported its biggest one-month employment surge since 1976, when the government started collecting comparable data.

Statistics Canada says labour market added 106,500 jobs in April, and the bulk of them were full time.

The increase helped drop the unemployment rate to 5.7 per cent last month from 5.8 per cent in March.

The labour market has seen strong employment numbers since mid-2016 and has remained a bright spot for an economy that has struggled in other areas — to the point it almost stalled over the winter.

Unemployment rate in New Brunswick

In the Edmundston and Woodstock region, the unemployment rate was sitting at 8.4 per cent — the same as this time last year.

In the Fredericton and Oromocto region, the unemployment rate was at 8.3 per cent, down from 8.5 per cent this time last year.

In the Saint John and St. Stephen region, the rate was at 6.8 per cent, down from 7.1 per cent. 

In the Moncton and Richibucto region, unemployment was at 8.9 per cent, up from 8.2 per cent this time last year.

In Campbellton and Miramichi, the unemployment rate was at 15.4 per cent, up from 14.4 per cent. 

With files from the Canadian Press

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