New Brunswick

Saint John chief orders probe of allegations about deputy in Oland case

The Saint John Police Force's new chief has ordered an investigation into allegations that Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey suggested another officer lie under oath about the Richard Oland murder case.

Glen McCloskey accused of suggesting another officer lie about his presence at crime scene

The Saint John Police Force's new chief has ordered an investigation into allegations that Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey suggested another officer lie under oath about the Richard Oland murder case.

John Bates, Saint John's new police chief, says it would be improper for him to comment on testimony at Dennis Oland's murder trial. (Twitter)
Chief John Bates has directed the force's professional standards unit to look into the issue, raised Tuesday by retired staff sergeant Mike King during his testimony at Dennis Oland's murder trial and denied Wednesday by McCloskey.

The Saint John Board of Police Commissioners and the New Brunswick Police Commission have both been advised, Bates said in an emailed statement to CBC News.

Bates will "be in consultation with the NBPC with regard to conducting a thorough investigation into the allegation," the statement said.

McCloskey, who served as the force's acting chief between Bill Reid's retirement in April and a few weeks ago when Bates took over the role, remains on active duty.

On Wednesday, McCloskey denied King's allegations that he suggested he alter his testimony about McCloskey's presence in the bloody murder scene.

He suggested during his testimony at Dennis Oland's trial that it was King who lied on the stand because he was angry about being passed over for a promotion to inspector.

Bates said it would be improper for him to comment on any of the testimony.

Our members go about their duties with my full confidence; they have already earned and continue to hold the confidence and respect of the greater Saint John community.- John Bates, Saint John Police Force chief

But he said "the men and women of the Saint John Police Force have and will continue to deliver exceptional and first-rate service to this community each and every day."

"Our members go about their duties with my full confidence; they have already earned and continue to hold the confidence and respect of the greater Saint John community."

King testified that some time last year, either before or during Dennis Oland's preliminary inquiry, McCloskey, who was an inspector at the time and his supervisor, referred to another officer as being an "idiot" for having said that McCloskey had entered the scene.

King said his reaction was, "You were in the room." McCloskey's reply, according to King, was, "Well, you don't have to tell them that."

When asked about King's allegation that McCloskey also had a box of evidence related to the Oland case in his office, against normal procedure, McCloskey said he couldn't recall.

Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey testified Wednesday that he didn't suggest anyone alter their testimony about his presence at the Richard Oland crime scene. (CBC)
McCloskey was also asked about a clandestine meeting King alleged he had set up for him one night at midnight at the Boston Pizza parking lot on the city's east side.

King said a man, whom he believed to be an RCMP officer, got into his vehicle, told him to drive to the yacht club in the city's north end and instructed him that if any calls came into dispatch regarding suspicious activity in the area, King should redirect his officers from responding.

Defence lawyer Alan Gold revealed that a boat search related to the Oland case had been conducted at the Royal Kennebecasis Yacht Club.

McCloskey said the meeting had nothing to do with the Oland case, but rather was related to a "high level RCMP investigation" he was not at liberty to discuss.

​Richard Oland's body was discovered in his investment firm office at 52 Canterbury St., on July 7, 2011. He had suffered 45 sharp and blunt force injuries to his head, neck and hands.

Dennis Oland, 47, who was the last known person to see his father alive during a meeting at his office the night before, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder.

The Saint John Board of Police Commissioners is the governance authority for the police force. Its role is "to establish a vision and actionable objectives for the community, to provide oversight (including complaints) and to ensure accountability in the application of police resources to accomplish the objectives, according to its web site.

"The Saint John Board of Police Commissioners has a responsibility under the Police Act to "provide and maintain an adequate police force" and to advise Common Council accordingly, so the municipality can budget the necessary money. In determining what constitutes an adequate police force, the Board (in consultation with the Chief of Police) has established priorities and objectives," the web site states.

The New Brunswick Police Commission is an independent oversight body, which investigates and resolves citizens' complaints relating to the conduct of police officers, according to its web site.

It also determines if municipal, regional, and Royal Canadian Mounted Police forces offer "adequate services within the Province and whether each municipality and the Province are carrying out their responsibility for the maintenance of an acceptable level of police services," the web site states.

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