New Brunswick

Sackville Golf and Country Club works out kinks on the links

It's time to hit the links, even at the Sackville Golf and Country Club, which, despite a brutal winter and other challenges, is open for business.

Despite harsh weather and some financial challenges, Sackville club is open once more

Jack Drover, the club president, says conditions have improved significantly at the Sackville Golf and Country Club, and he hopes to see avid golfers out this weekend. (Submitted )

It's time to hit the links, even at the Sackville Golf and Country Club, which, despite a brutal winter and other challenges, is open for business.

If you can't maintain the course, the next thing the cows are eating the grass, or the real estate developers are building houses.- Jack Drover, Sackville club president

The season got off to a slow start. The course opening was pushed back from the hoped-for date because of damage sustained in January's ice storm. 

"Course conditions have improved significantly," Jack Drover, the club president, said in an interview Wednesday with Information Morning Moncton.

And the harsh winter turned out to be a blessing in disguise, Drover said.

"We did have to do a bunch of tree-limbing, and Mother Nature helped us there in early January," he said. "At the time it turned cold, we were able to get some trucks on course and remove a lot, so that was done."

Maintaining the course

The Sackville golf club has opened for business after a brutal winter and financial trouble that threatened the proper maintenance of the course. (Submitted)

Drover said the key to opening the course is getting the maintenance equipment out and working.

"Greens are done by the lawn mowers," he said. "And the tee boxes. But if the course is wet then we have a problem."

That was the problem this year. Drover said Sackville doesn't have great drainage when it comes to heavy rain.

"We just had to sit and watch a lot the last 10 days," he said. "We had Mother Nature water holes rather than our own."

Surviving the hardship

Drover said the club also had some operational issues.

"It's nothing to do with personnel," he said. "It has to do with paying the bills, of course, and it was creating challenges."

At the end of last season, the golf course had the money to address certain issues, including maintenance and equipment, that are essential to supporting the golfing experience. 

"If you can't maintain your course, it's Catch 22," he said. "If you can't maintain the course, the next thing the cows are eating the grass, or the real estate developers are building houses."

With files from Information Morning Moncton

now