New Brunswick

Premier Blaine Higgs among those 'blacklisted' by Russia

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is among 87 Canadian citizens added Thursday to Russia's so-called "blacklist" that bars entry into the country.

87 names added to list that bars entry into Russia in response to Canadian sanctions

a man stands at a podium
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is among the Canadian citizens who can no longer set foot in Russia. (Stephen MacGillivray/The Canadian Press)

New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs is among 87 Canadian citizens added Thursday to Russia's so-called "blacklist" that bars entry into the country.

Russia's foreign ministry added the political, military and business figures to the list in response to Canadian sanctions during the invasion of Ukraine, according to Artem Kalabukhov, political counsellor for Russia's embassy in Ottawa.

"Russia works tit-for-tat with its moves against unfriendly countries, and this policy continues," he said.

Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston, Prince Edward Island Premier Dennis King, and Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Andrew Furey are also named, along with the premiers of Quebec and the three territories, and the lieutenant governors of the 10 provinces.

Also blacklisted were Bombardier CEO Éric Martel and the heads of various technology companies who have donated to Ukraine or discussed providing equipment to its army.

Foreign Affairs Minister Melanie Joly pledged Thursday to soon ramp up existing sanctions.

Canada has sanctioned business leaders, organizations and companies with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin as well as the country's military and security services.

The sanctioned people have had their Canadian assets frozen and will be prevented from doing business in the country. 

"All these sanctions against Russia are of a symbolic nature and unable to affect the Russian economy, and the Canadian government knows this very well," Kalabukhov said.

Joly is expected to deliver a national speech Monday, focusing on Canadian support for Ukraine.

With files from Radio-Canada and The Canadian Press

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