New Brunswick

Up to 70 mm of rain expected as post-tropical storm Erin hits southeastern New Brunswick

New Brunswick's Emergency Measures Organization is urging residents to be prepared as post-tropical storm Erin continues to track northeastward toward the Maritimes.

EMO urges residents to take precautions, be prepared

The rain is expected to taper off Thursday night or Friday morning, according to Environment Canada. (Kirk Pennell/CBC)

New Brunswick's Emergency Measures Organization is urging residents to be prepared as post-tropical storm Erin continues to track northeastward toward the Maritimes.

Environment Canada has issued rainfall warnings for the southeastern part of the province. As much as 70 mm of rain is now expected, up from earlier predictions of 60 mm.

The rain will be heavy at times as a trough of low pressure crosses New Brunswick and interacts with moisture from Erin, before it tapers off in the evening or Friday morning, the advisory states.

Heavy downpours can cause flash floods, water pooling on roads and washouts, it warns.

Rainfall warnings have also been issued for western and northern Nova Scotia and western Prince Edward Island.

Although wind gusts are not expected to reach the warning criteria of 90 km/h or higher, they could still be strong enough to cause isolated power outages and minor damage.

"New Brunswickers need to be prepared for this and stay up to date with the latest information," Stacey Cooling, acting director of the New Brunswick EMO, said in a statement.

(Ryan Snoddon/CBC)

As of 3 p.m., Erin was located about 430 kilometres south-southwest of Yarmouth, N.S., and moving north-northeast at 39 kilometres per hour. Maximum sustained winds had reached 65 km/h.

The next update is expected at 9 p.m.

New Brunswick EMO recommends having a 72-hour emergency preparedness kit.

Heavy rainfall has started to pool on some Saint John streets, such as this stretch of Rothesay Avenue. (Kirk Pennell/CBC)

Homeowners should ensure their gutters and nearby catch basins are clear to avoid flooding and objects that could blow away, such as lawn furniture, should be secured or taken inside.

Those with generators should ensure they have enough gas and are working properly.

Motorists should avoid water-covered roads.

The City of Saint John said localized flooding will likely occur in low-lying areas. Driving through floodwaters can increase damage to homes in the area, it said.

Police will ticket motorists who fail to abide by road closures, it said in a statement.

Environment Canada lifted the rainfall warning in the Fredericton and Oromocto area on Thursday afternoon, but it remains in effect for much of southeastern New Brunswick. (Environment Canada)