New Brunswick

Oromocto students compete to design the next emoji

Sometimes an emoji is much more satisfying way to punctuate a text message than trying to articulate a thought in words.

Grade 6 students at Harold Peterson Middle School took turns creating their own emojis

Grade 6 students at Harold Peterson Middle School created their own emojis for a class project. 2:14

Sometimes an emoji is much more satisfying way to punctuate a text message than trying to articulate a thought in words.

Perhaps that's why the Oxford English Dictionary declared the image of a smiley face crying tears of joy as its "word of the year."

Now a class of Grade 6 students in Oromocto is trying to further diversify the range of digital images available to emoji-happy texters.

The students are using their skills in persuasive arguing to convince a panel of judges to pick their emoji.

Janice Shaw, a teacher at Harold Peterson Middle School, said the creative students are trying to come up with an emoji idea that would be used around the world.

"That it would be an emoji that would be used by a lot of people," she said.

The Unicode Consortium created a coding standard allowing the originally Japanese created icons to be seen on systems in other parts of the world. It also chooses new emojis every year.

The raised eyebrow is on the books for 2017.

But only a few concepts for new emojis make the cut each year.

Noah Gallant said the world needs an "I'm busy" emoji for those hectic moments in life.

"Your mom saying what do you want for supper, texting, and you're like I'm busy and you just go boop," he said.

Colin Fergusson took his emoji imagination in a different direction. He said he has the perfect digital icon to make people smile.

"Rubber ducks lighten peoples' moods, so if you had a friend who was having a bad, you could just send them a rubber duck and it might cheer them up," he said.

After the votes were counted, the emoji winners in Oromocto were: Bad Hair Day, Dizzy, and I'm busy.

with files from Catherine Harrop

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.