New Brunswick

Dennis Oland trial hears investigator knew of allegation against deputy chief

The lead investigator in the murder of Richard Oland knew about the allegation that Saint John Police Force Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey had suggested another officer lie to the court, but didn't tell anyone about it, Dennis Oland's jury heard on Friday.

Const. Stephen Davidson says he didn't tell superiors because he didn't know if it was true

Dennis Oland trial Day 24

7 years ago
Duration 1:59
Dennis Oland was warned by police that whatever he said about actions on July 6, 2011, would be verified by video surveillance, his murder trial heard on Friday.

The lead investigator in the murder of Richard Oland knew about the allegation that Saint John Police Force Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey had suggested another officer lie to the court, but didn't tell anyone about it, Dennis Oland's jury heard on Friday.

Const. Stephen Davidson says he didn't tell his supervisors about the allegation against the deputy chief because he didn't know if it was true and he believed it would come out through the Crown. (CBC)
Const. Stephen Davidson agreed under cross-examination by defence lawyer Gary Miller that the allegation made by retired staff sergeant Mike King was "serious."

But he said he didn't tell his superiors because he only knew what King had told him on Sept. 8 about his alleged exchange with McCloskey regarding the Oland crime scene.

"I didn't know the truth of it," he said.

Davidson also said that King told him he planned to tell the Crown about it, "so I had every belief it was going to be known."

King did tell the Crown on Sept. 29, before he was scheduled to testify at the trial.

And last week, he testified that McCloskey told him he didn't "have to" tell anyone that McCloskey went into Richard Oland's bloody office to observe the bludgeoned body on July 7, 2011.

The prominent businessman was found lying face down in a large pool of blood in his investment firm office on Canterbury Street.

Dennis Oland, 47, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the 2011 death of his father, prominent businessman Richard Oland. (CBC)
The 69-year-old had suffered 45 blunt and sharp force injuries to his head, neck and hands.

Dennis Oland, 47, who was the last known person to see his father alive during a meeting at his office the night before, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder.

King said there was no misunderstanding about what McCloskey suggested during that conversation, which occurred either before or during Dennis Oland's preliminary inquiry last year.

McCloskey, who was the inspector in charge of the criminal investigations division at the time, overseeing several units, including major crime and forensic identification, has denied the allegation under oath.

The deputy chief suggested King made it up because he was bitter about being passed over for a promotion.

Deputy Chief Glen McCloskey has denied the allegation that he suggested retired staff sergeant Mike King lie to the court. (CBC)
McCloskey testified that he entered the crime scene twice — once to "observe the body" and then again out of "curiosity."

"It was wrong, I shouldn't have been in there," said McCloskey.

The 27-year veteran said he was "embarrassed," admitting that he went farther into the crime scene than directed by the head of the forensic identification unit and without any protective gear on to avoid contaminating the scene.

McCloskey also said he might have touched — and even opened — the back door located in the foyer outside Oland's office, which Dennis Oland's defence lawyers have suggested would have been the "preferred exit route" of the killer.

Former Fredericton police chief Barry MacKnight has been appointed by the New Brunswick Police Commission to investigate a complaint against McCloskey, made by the new chief of the Saint John Police Force.

Chief John Bates requested the investigation on Oct. 14, following King's testimony.

MacKnight will not begin the investigation under the Police Act until the conclusion of the Oland trial.

The trial is scheduled to run until Dec. 18.

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