New Brunswick

One of Fredericton's oldest buildings is going up for sale

The congregation at Christ Church Cathedral has voted to sell Odell House, which it has owned for more than a century.

'It's kind of an extra property at the moment, and it was decided that it might be just as well to sell it'

Odell House was built in downtown Fredericton in the late 1700s. (Lauren Bird CBC News)

A Fredericton landmark is being prepared for sale.

The congregation at Christ Church Cathedral has voted to sell Odell House, which it has owned for more than a century.

"Our hope would be that, if it's sold, that the the people that purchase it will have an appreciation for it and want to maintain it," said Rev. Geoffrey Hall.

Hall said the time has come for the church to sell the building, which is thought to have been completed in the 1780s.

The wooden white house with red shutters and three chimneys was, for many years, where the cathedral's deans lived. But the past two deans haven't lived there.

"It's kind of an extra property at the moment, and it was decided that it might be just as well to sell it," Hall said.

Odell House in downtown Fredericton was built for Jonathan Odell, a Loyalist, a poet, a doctor and teacher. He was also the provincial secretary.

The building has a rich history.

It's where plans were made for 104th Regiment's march from Fredericton to Kingston in the War of 1812, according to architect and historian John Leroux.

"A lot of provincial planning would have gone on (there)," Leroux said.

"So much of New Brunswick history has happened in this house, beyond the fact that it's just absolutely beautiful."

The congregation at Christ Church Cathedral has voted to sell Odell House, which it has owned for more than a century. (Lauren Bird CBC News)

It also had slave quarters, which were removed when the Cathedral Memorial Hall was built.

Richard Bird, president of the Fredericton Heritage Trust, is hopeful a new owner will give new life to the building.

"I would like to think that someone is going to recognize the historical importance of the building and maintain it," he said. "In fact, the church has had difficulty maintaining it. So I'm hoping that the new purchaser will maintain it even better."

Because the house is located in the city's heritage zone, it does fall under protection. Much of the development in the area must be approved by the city's preservation board.

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