New Brunswick

Nuisance deer bow hunting rules raise safety concerns

A man in Hampton is raising concerns about the provincial government's Nuisance Deer Management Assistance Program after he came face to face with a bow hunter in his backyard.

Hampton man says he's wearing an orange vest outside after finding a hunter in his backyard

A man in Hampton is raising concerns about the provincial government's Nuisance Deer Management Assistance Program after he came face to face with a bow hunter in his backyard.

Gordon Gilmore says he recently saw a deer in distress on his property and when he went outside to investigate, he found a hunter.

Gilmore's land is not approved for deer hunting, but he discovered his neighbour's is and that under the Department of Natural Resources' rules, hunters who believe they've wounded an animal are authorized to trespass to ensure it's killed.

In addition, the restriction of not discharging a weapon within 100 metres of a dwelling does not apply in such a situation, said Gilmore.

"To me, it's an accident waiting to happen," he told CBC's Information Morning Saint John.

Gilmore says he's afraid for his safety and has started wearing an orange vest and hat and playing his radio loudly whenever he is working outside.

The nuisance deer program in the Kennebecasis Valley continues until Nov. 22.

Under the program, the department has issued 200 special deer hunting permits, which allow hunters to take deer inside the towns of Hampton, Quispamsis and Rothesay.

Hunters are normally allowed to kill only one deer each during the seven-week season, but those issued a special permit have the opportunity to take a second deer.

Property owners nominate their land and provide a list of hunters they'll allow.

Gilmore believes people who have posted their property should notify their neighbours.

 

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