Smoke from B.C. fires brings haze, reddish sun to New Brunswick

Wildfire smoke has travelled more than 4,000 kilometres and laid a haze over New Brunswick skies, but there's no risk of poor air quality, Environment Canada says.

Environment Canada statement says there's no air-quality risk for New Brunswickers

Environment Canada says in a provincewide air quality statement that smoke from fires in Western Canada is moving 'at high altitude across the Maritimes.' (Hadeel Ibrahim/CBC)

Wildfire smoke has travelled more than 4,000 kilometres and laid a haze over New Brunswick skies, but there's no risk of poor air quality, Environment Canada says.

The weather agency issued a provincewide air quality statement on Friday afternoon saying smoke from fires in Western Canada is moving "at high altitude across the Maritimes, causing hazy skies and a reddish sun."

Verne Tom photographs a wildfire burning along a logging road about 20 kilometres southwest of Fort St. James, B.C. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

The statement said the smoke is not expected to affect air quality in the region, since the haze will likely not reach ground level.

The plume will move slowly off to the east tonight, the statement said.

The smoke is travelling from fires in the central-northern corridor of British Columbia, where wildfires have been blazing for weeks.

On Wednesday, the Muddy Lake, Lovell Creek South and Tahltan River fires merged with the Alkali Lake fire, creating a 100,000-hectare blaze.

New Brunswick has sent about 20 firefighters to help fight the wildfires.