New Brunswick

New Brunswick loses 1,100 jobs in August, labour force report shows

New Brunswick's economy lost 1,100 jobs and the unemployment rate increased to 8.3 per cent in August, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

Statistics Canada's monthly report shows 1,700 full-time jobs were lost, as 700 part-time jobs were created

Statistics Canada's monthly labour force report says New Brunswick's unemployment rate increased to 8.3 per cent in August from 7.5 per cent in July. (Shane Fowler/CBC)

New Brunswick's economy lost 1,100 jobs and the unemployment rate increased to 8.3 per cent in August, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

The province lost 1,700 full-time jobs even as it gained 700 part-time jobs last month.

The labour force report, which was released on Friday morning, showed the unemployment rate climbed to 8.3 per cent last month, from 7.5 per cent in July.

New Brunswick has been losing jobs since June, but the August unemployment rate, up from 7.8 per cent a year ago, was still the lowest in the Atlantic region.  

In Nova Scotia, the unemployment rate was just above New Brunswick at 8.4 per cent. In Prince Edward Island, the rate was 9.3 per cent, and Newfoundland and Labrador 14.4 per cent.

Canada as a whole lost 51,600 jobs, pushing the unemployment rate to six per cent in August from 5.8 per cent in June.

Within the province

The Campbellton and Miramichi region carried an unemployment rate of 11.1 per cent in August which was the highest in New Brunswick.

The second highest was in Saint John and St. Stephen area, at 7.3 per cent.

In Fredericton and Oromocto, the rate was at 6.6 per cent followed closely by Moncton Richibucto at 6.4 per cent.

Edmundston and Woodstock showed the lowest unemployment rate among the regions at 4.8 per cent.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now