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Election debrief: After all that and we still don't know who's in charge

Thank heavens there's an election newsletter to help you sort through one wild night.

PCs claim victory with minority government, but Liberals won't roll over

Good morning,

I'm so tired, and with good reason. It's the wee hours of Tuesday morning following a wild election night full of twists, turns and an unhealthy amount of caffeine.

And we still don't know who's going to form government.

It was an extremely tight race - and both the PCs and Liberals say they will make a case to govern. 0:28

The Progressive Conservatives are claiming victory after winning 22 seats, one more than the Liberals. Both leaders said they intend to govern. Things get murky from there, but fortunately provincial affairs reporter Jacques Poitras will help you sort through it.

Also, the People's Alliance made some history, the Greens tripled their presence in the legislature and the NDP are sent back to the drawing board (again).

We have recaps and analysis galore, cabinet losers and regional breakdowns.

Here's what we're talking on the day after the election day:

The election, in 90 seconds

As PCs claim victory, Liberals try to hold onto power. 1:40

Analysis

Prior to the election, CBC polling wizard Eric Grénier explained how the Liberals suffer historically from an inefficient vote.

Well, history repeated itself Monday night. At 37.8 per cent, the Liberals carried the lion's share of the popular vote but failed to win the most seats. 

Grénier explores how that issue reared its head again and other fascinating voter dynamics.

Also, Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs may have won more seats on Monday night, but a constitutional expert says Liberal Leader Brian Gallant should have the first opportunity to form a government.

Jacques Poitras examined what happens now after New Brunswick elected its first minority government in almost 100 years.

Top headlines

Progressive Conservative Leader Blaine Higgs, left, won more seats, but Liberal Leader Brian Gallant still intends to form government. (CBC)
New Brunswick Progressive Conservative leader embraces his wife Marcia as he addresses supporters at his campaign headquarters in Quispamsis on Monday. (Andrew Vaughan/THE CANADIAN PRESS)
David Coon enjoys his victory in Fredericton South on Monday night.
People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin made history Monday night, as his party won its first seats. (Jonathan Collicott/CBC News)
NDP Leader Jennifer McKenzie was the only main party leader who failed to be elected. (Photo: CBC)
Liberal Cathy Rogers (left) and Liberal Monique LeBlanc were two of the 11 female candidates elected on Monday night. (Ian Bonnell/CBC)
Liberal Francine Landry was one of the cabinet ministers, who was re-elected on Monday. (CBC)

The pulse

The Green Party's support soared both in the popular vote count and in social media mentions. 

Cameron Gordon with Twitter Canada sends along a note that Green Party Leader David Coon received the most mentions on the social media platform as of midnight Atlantic time.

New Brunswick Green Party Leader David Coon was popular on social media during the election campaign. (James West/The Canadian Press)

Coon was mentioned 1.2 times more than Liberal Leader Brian Gallant, 1.45 times more than PC Leader Blaine Higgs and 2.9 times more than People's Alliance Leader Kris Austin. 

Gordon notes that the environment was the top issue discussed by those using the hashtag #NBpoli. 

"As of midnight, Sept. 24, 2018, had the most uses of #nbpoli on Twitter of any day in history," Gordon said.

Regional breakdowns

Kevin Arseneau was one of three Green candidates elected on Monday night. (Tori Weldon/CBC)
The Moncton region stayed true to its history by electing Liberals. (Kate Letterick/CBC News )

A blue wave washed over the Saint John region on election night. (Julia Wright / CBC)
Greg Thompson's return to politics was a success as the former MP was elected for the Tories in Saint Croix. (Roger Cosman/CBC)
Mary Wilson was elected in Oromocto-Lincoln-Fredericton, but the capital region didn't lean Tory throughout. Fredericton voters chose candidates of all stripes. (Julia Wright / CBC)
Robert Gauvin managed to flip Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou from Liberal to Tory on Monday night. (Jacques Poitras/CBC)

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