New Brunswick

New breath technology to detect lung cancer

The Atlantic Cancer Research Institute in Moncton is beginning clinical trials of new breath analysis technology that is designed to detect lung cancer.

The Atlantic Cancer Research Institute in Moncton is beginning clinical trials of new breath analysis technology that is designed to detect lung cancer.

The infrared-based technology was developed by Picomole Instruments Inc., a private company also based in Moncton.

Picomole has spent more than $4 million developing the techonology.

Together, Picomole and the Atlantic Cancer Research will be doing clinical trials on 90 patients comparing the breath samples of lung cancer patients with others.

John Cormier, founder and CEO of Picomole, said he hopes the clinical trials will show that the technology can identify so called "bio-markers" of lung cancer.

"It's almost hard to get your head around the possibilities because it's a complete game-changer," Cormier, a physicist, said.

"It changes the way that this disease can be approached, can be revealed and as a consequence managed and of course it's completely transformative to our company.  We go from a very small group of technology developers to looking at our plans going forward, much, much larger company that has a global market in mind."

Cormier founded his company in 2005 and re-located to Moncton from Edmonton last May.

Picomole Instruments employs six people full-time.

He said the Atlantic Cancer Research Institute needs a minimum of 30 patients to take part in the year-long trials.

 

 

 

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