N.B. Grit support steady, NDP gains: poll

The ruling New Brunswick Liberals have stabilized their support and opened up a slight lead over the Progressive Conservatives a year before the 2010 provincial election, according to a Corporate Research Associates poll.

Progressive Conservatives and Alward lose ground to NDP

The ruling New Brunswick Liberals have stabilized their support and opened up a slight lead over the Progressive Conservatives a year before the 2010 provincial election, according to a Corporate Research Associates poll.

The August CRA quarterly poll indicated the Liberals are holding steady at 41 per cent of the decided vote, compared with 35 per cent for the Tories and 22 per cent for the New Democratic Party.

The latest poll offers some sobering news for the Tories, who had surged to 40 per cent and a tie with the Liberals in May's CRA poll.

The NDP's support rose from 16 per cent in the May survey.

The undecided level was little changed at 43 per cent, compared with 42 per cent in May.

Source: Corporate Research Associates August poll. Margin of error: 3.4 percentage points, 95 times out of 100
   CRA August N.B. Political Poll
  May 2009 August 2009
 Liberals 41 41
 PC 40 35
 NDP 16 22

CRA chief executive Don Mills said NDP Leader Roger Duguay can likely credit Nova Scotia's newly elected NDP Premier Darrell Dexter for the bump in popular support.

"We're wondering if that had a positive impact for the NDP … in New Brunswick," Mills said.

Dexter became Atlantic Canada's first NDP premier on June 9, unseating the Progressive Conservatives.

Duguay said he agrees there's been a spillover from the Nova Scotia election. He also said he kept his promise when he became leader to work hard to raise the party's profile.

"Like I said, I'll be present. I'm going to visit communities. I'm going to talk with people in New Brunswick, and that's what I'm doing."

Graham, Alward support falls

Progressive Conservative Leader David Alward's personal support fell to 21 per cent from 28 per cent in May, while Duguay saw his approval jump to 12 per cent from six per cent during the same period.

Premier Shawn Graham, meanwhile, saw his personal support wane to 35 per cent from 39 per cent.

CRA polled 806 New Brunswick residents between Aug. 12 to 29. The survey is considered accurate within 3.4 percentage points, 95 out of 100 times.

While the level of political support for the Liberals is holding, the satisfaction with the Graham government saw a modest upward tick in support.

The CRA poll indicated 53 per cent of respondents were satisfied with the government, versus 50 per cent in May.

At the same time, the number of people who told the polling company that they were dissatisfied with the government dropped to 37 per cent from 41 per cent.