New Brunswick

Brazil learns about Moncton through YouTube channel

People in Brazil are hearing about life in Moncton through a YouTube channel dedicated to detailing life in Canada for Brazilians.

Canadá em Porteguês posts interview of Brazilian couple now living in Moncton

Sergio Silva is from Brazil but now lives in Moncton. (Canadá em Porteguês/YouTube)

People in Brazil are hearing about life in Moncton through a YouTube channel dedicated to detailing life in Canada for Brazilians.

Sergio Silva, who lives in Moncton but is originally from Brazil, was interviewed by Canadá em Porteguêafter he left a comment on one of the channel's video's talking about life in New Brunswick.

The video has been viewed almost 2,500 times and Silva says he is getting lots of questions from Brazilians expressing an interest in moving to Moncton.

Silva, who is a New Brunswick Community College student, said Moncton's low cost of living compared to larger cities in Canada was what first attracted him to the city.

But Silva says it's the friendly population that makes him want to stay.

"People from here, from Moncton, from New Brunswick, they like to share their culture from abroad," he said.

"And that's what I believe is the biggest asset here."

Adrianna Campbell said there weren't a lot of other Brazilians in the city when she moved to Moncton in 1996, but now the community is growing.

Campbell, who was not part of the YouTube channel interview, said many Brazilians are attracted to Moncton because it's a small city.

"If you come from a big city, life can be very stressful."

"And the cities in Brazil are a lot bigger than the cities in Canada, so it's very attractive."

Campbell says some members of Moncton's Brazilian community have taken to mixing Portuguese and English, calling it their own version of chiac.

With files from Suzanne Lapointe

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