New Brunswick

Minto murals show off town history

Some new artwork is being unveiled along the streets of Minto hanks to some residents in the town who commissioned murals to be painted by Fredericton artist Ron Sajack.

Fredericton artist Ron Sajack commissioned to paint the town

Richard Veenhuis commissioned a mural to be painted on the side of his Foodland grocery store back in October. (CBC)

Some new artwork is being unveiled along the streets of Minto thanks to some residents in the town who commissioned murals to be painted by Fredericton artist Ron Sajack. 

Richard Veenhuis commissioned a mural to be painted on the side of his Foodland grocery store back in October, telling the history of Minto's mining industry.

"It helps young people realize there's a history," he said. "I've always been a bit of a history buff so it's just nice to know where we came from."

Veenhuis and his wife had always admired murals in other small towns, and thought it would be great way to give back to the community that took them in nine years ago.

"It was a gift between my wife and me to the town of Minto, in appreciation for them making me one of them," he said.

That's the reason Peter Miller commissioned murals on his business as well.

"Well, I've always had an interest in railroading and my father was a railroader and the railroad in this area," he said.

Both murals were done by Ron Sajack, who has painted murals across the province. Sajack is currently painting a mural in Fredericton.

He says painting these murals not only allows him to showcase the town's history, but he also gets to learn about it along the way, including the mining history of the area.  

"I didn't know about the Maid Marion, how huge that dragline was. Also the various shafts, and the danger of the occupation itself. It was a learning experience," he said.

The murals are expected to last about seven years. After that Veenhuis hopes to put up characters from the Minto area on the other side of the building.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.