New Brunswick

McAdam hit by more quakes

There were two more earthquakes in McAdam Tuesday morning – and there could be more to come, according to Natural Resources Canada.

Two Tuesday morning - and possibly more to come

There were two more earthquakes in McAdam Tuesday morning – and there could be more to come, according to Natural Resources Canada.

The first one hit at 3:28 a.m. and had a magnitude of 2, while the second one at 3:44 a.m. registered 1.9.

They come on the heels of Saturday’s 2.4-magnitude quake, which were followed by several other booms into Monday.

It’s what officials call an "earthquake swarm," which means several quakes of about the same size, said seismologist Cathy Woodgold.

She wouldn't be surprised if there are more quakes, she said, adding there’s no reason to get overly alarmed.

'It's like a huge explosion under your house.'—Laura McGee,McAdam resident

Some residents reported experiencing another tremor about 2 p.m. Tuesday.

Connie Klein, a clerk for the village, told CBC News staff at the village office felt a minor shock.

"There was a bang," she said. "I guess I thought that I heard something, I don’t know exactly what it was, but I guess I thought something upstairs had fallen over and I guess it was a little tremor, or a boom, I guess you could call it."

Although Tuesday’s quakes were weaker than Saturday's, area residents say they didn’t feel smaller.

"It was louder, it was bigger. The house shook. It's like a huge explosion under your house," said Laura McGee.

"When you go to bed at night now, it's like, are we going to be awakened again at night? You know, it's a nerve-wracking thing when you hear something like that and you don't know what the heck it is."

The noise woke up just about everyone in the southwestern village, said McGee.

"My daughter, she's 20 and she just flew out of bed and it takes a lot to jar her."

Some people had pictures fall from their walls and the social networks were buzzing, said McGee.

"Those kinds of things didn't happen on Saturday night."

Woodgold said the latest quakes may have felt bigger because they were closer to town or closer to the surface.

"If it's a small earthquake and you're close to it, it's more like a noise and a shock rather than motion from side to side," she said.

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