New Brunswick

Maritime university grads face bigger challenges, APEC says

A new report by the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council has found university graduates in the Maritimes have higher unemployment rates, lower wages and higher student loan debt compared to graduates in other parts of the country.

New report on labour market finds higher unemployoment rates, lower wages, and higher debt in region

A new report by the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council has found university graduates in the Maritimes have higher unemployment rates, lower wages and higher student loan debt compared to graduates in other parts of the country.

Elizabeth Beale, head of the Atlantic Provinces Economic Council, says the structure of some university programs should be changed to ensure better job prospects for graduates. (CBC)
Elizabeth Beale, president and CEO of APEC, says the findings of the report, entitled University Graduates and the Atlantic Labour Market, explain why many Maritime graduates leave the region.

Beale says while there are good opportunities and wages for graduates of professional programs or applied sciences, there is a significant gap for others.

"So I think it says something about, you know, how do we structure our education programs in the humanities and social sciences to make sure that those individuals who are taking those will also have better employment prospects because at the moment, we’re releasing young people into the labour market without much thought of  what kind of jobs they’re going to get in the future," she said.

The business community should also be more willing to hire young workers and invest in them so they are more likely to stay, said Beale.

APEC is an independent, not for profit research and public policy organization set up to advance economic development in the region.

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