New Brunswick

2 injured love birds to spend winter at wildlife institute

The two mallard ducks are so inseparable that their devotion has made them both injured and unable to fly.

2 ducks found in Moncton area are recuperating together at the Atlantic Wildlife Institute

The two loving ducks were found in a suburban Moncton community, where mallard ducks are often found, when they were spotted by residents. (Atlantic Wildlife Institute)

A pair of lovebirds has found a new home at the Atlantic Wildlife Institute for the winter.

The two mallard ducks are so inseparable that their devotion has made them both injured and unable to fly.

"The female showed up looking like she had an injured wing and the male was sticking around with her," said Pam Novak of AWI.

"In this case the male was just not going to leave her side. Then the male then showed up with an injured wing … we have no idea what caused the injuries," she said.

The two loving ducks were found in a suburban Moncton community, where mallard ducks are often found, when they were spotted by residents.

"They [ducks] have these very strong pair bonds and they mate for life. They stay together until one perishes," said Novak. "These two birds would not leave each other and he tried to keep protecting her."

A homeowner was able to pick both of the birds up but Novak says the injuries are not new.

"They're older injuries so we are letting them heal here to see how they are going to do over the long term."

Novak is concerned for their long-term flight capabilities, but for right now they're comfortable at the Institute and just as in love.

"They feed and bathe together … they're inseparable, truly inseparable. They've tried so hard to try and survive and keep each other together and stuff so it's what we can do to help."

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