New Brunswick

Kelly Lamrock pitches you-lie-you-pay law

Liberal leadership candidate Kelly Lamrock is proposing a rule that would see political parties financially punished for breaking their promises.

Political parties would lose funding if they break election promises

Liberal leadership candidate Kelly Lamrock is proposing a rule that would see political parties financially punished for breaking their promises.

Lamrock said in an interview on Friday that he believes New Brunswick voters want honesty and trust in a government, something he believes is lacking now.

"Let’s face it, during the election, to some extent I think both parties were probably guilty of it, there were a lot of promises made and now it has gotten to the point in politics where people almost accept that nobody tells the truth during elections," Lamrock said.

Kelly Lamrock, seen here speaking with reporters in 2008, said he'd like a you-lie-you-pay law to force politicians to honour their campaign commitments. (CBC

"One thing that I’ve been proposing is an idea, is we should actually have you-lie-you-pay legislation for politicians who lie their way into office."

The Fredericton lawyer said political parties should be forced to register their promises during an election. And when that party forms power, an independent office would hold them to account to make sure they follow through on their campaign commitments.

"If an independent office finds for instance they have not delivered, that they have lied their way into office, they should see a reduction in the funding they get from the Political Process Financing Act," he said.

"One thing that has really happened and I think it is a shame, we have seen lying in politics becomes so common that now people say, ‘Oh well, they all do it, so we don’t know how to punish anyone for it.'"

The Alward government has been criticized for breaking its promise on a property tax freeze for seniors.

Political parties receive an annual allowance based on how many votes they received in the previous election.

In 2011-12, the Progressive Conservatives received $181,397 from Elections New Brunswick based on their share of the vote. The Liberals, meanwhile, received $128,078, the NDP received $38,686, the Green Party received $16,943 and the People’s Alliance received $4,363.

Lamrock confirmed this week that he would enter the Liberal leadership race.

Lamrock is joining former health minister Michael Murphy, Moncton-area lawyer Brian Gallant and former Belledune mayor Nick Duivenvoorden in the Liberal leadership race.