New Brunswick

John Mallory, Canada Games judo coach, resigns

A coach on New Brunswick's Canada Games judo team has resigned. A CBC investigation this week revealed that John Mallory had been suspended two years ago for misconduct involving a female athlete.

Coach suspended for four months in 2012 following Judo Canada hearing

John Mallory resigned Tuesday as judo coach on New Brunswick's Canada Games team. (Facebook)

A coach on New Brunswick's Canada Games judo team has resigned.

A CBC investigation this week revealed that John Mallory had been suspended two years ago for misconduct involving a female athlete.

Mallory was suspended for four months by Judo Canada, however the national organization imposed a strict confidentiality order on the discipline and people in New Brunswick's judo community were not informed.

In a statement released Tuesday on Mallory's behalf, Judo New Brunswick said Mallory resigned so athletes wouldn't be hurt by negative attention directed at the coach as they competed at the Canada Games.

"Preservation of the integrity of Judo New Brunswick and the spirit of the Winter Games is paramount to Mr. Mallory,” the statement said.

The incidents involves a former student, Martine Chenhall, and happened when she 13 and 14 years old.

In 2012, following a Judo Canada investigation, Mallory was found responsible for three misconduct violations. They include having unwanted physical contact, and making unwelcome advances toward Chenhall. He was also found to have breached the Code of Conduct for coaches by treating an athlete as a "teacher's pet" over a three-year period.

The incidents were investigated by police and no charges were laid.

As a result Mallory was suspended by Judo Canada for a four-month period ending Aug. 31, 2012. He was also ordered to take a course on ethics in sport.

Some have questioned why Mallory was appointed in 2013 as a coach for New Brunswick’s Canada Games judo team despite being found responsible for misconduct.

One of those who has concerns is Kiyokan Judo Club president Stephen Goddard. He’s also raised concerns about the confidentiality provisions surrounding the discipline, which he says effectively makes it impossible for parents to be informed of the misconduct.