New Brunswick

New Brunswick's economy gains 3,000 jobs in May, pushes unemployment rate down

New Brunswick's economy added 3,000 jobs in May, which helped dropped the province's unemployment rate, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

Statistics Canada's monthly report shows 5,700 jobs full-time jobs added and 2,700 part-time jobs were lost

Statistics Canada's monthly labour force report says New Brunswick's unemployment rate was at 7.2 per cent in May. (Matt York/Associated Press)

New Brunswick's economy added 3,000 jobs in May, which helped drop the province's unemployment rate to 7.2 per cent, according to Statistics Canada's monthly labour force survey.

In April, New Brunswick's unemployment rate was sitting at eight per cent.

The monthly labour force report was released on Friday and showed 5,700 full-time jobs were added last month. The report shows roughly 2,700 part-time jobs were lost.

Meanwhile, the Canadian economy added 27,700 jobs in May, enough to push the national jobless rate down to 5.4 per cent — its lowest level since 1976. 

The May number means Canada's economy has added 453,000 jobs in the past 12 months — an increase of 2.4 per cent. 

Most of the jobs were added in New Brunswick and other provinces such as Ontario, British Columbia and Nova Scotia. But the job market shrank in Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island. 

Now and a year ago

In the Campbellton and Miramichi area, the unemployment rate is sitting at 13.4 per cent, jumping from 12.6 per cent this time last year.

In the Moncton and Richibucto area, the unemployment rate is at 8.1 per cent. This time last year it was sitting at 8.2 per cent.

In the Saint John and St. Stephen area, the unemployment rate is at 6.5 per cent, dropping from 7.1 per cent last year.

In the Fredericton and Oromocto area, the unemployment rate is 7.6 per cent, increasing slightly from 7.4 per cent.

In the Edmundston and Woodstock area, unemployment is at 8.3 per cent, dropping from 8.5 per cent.

With files from Pete Evans

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