New Brunswick

Former nurse practitioner at Saint John jail suspended

The Nurses Association of New Brunswick has suspended longtime nurse practitioner Chandra Dawn Hume, who was responsible for the care of inmates at the Saint John Regional Correctional Centre.

Chandra Dawn Hume demonstrated 'incompetence, professional misconduct'

A former nurse practitioner at the Saint John Regional Correctional Centre has been suspended by the New Brunswick Association of Nurses. (CBC)

The Nurses Association of New Brunswick has suspended a longtime nurse practitioner.

Chandra Dawn Hume was an employee with Horizon Health from 1991 to May of this year.

Horizon Health will not reveal her place of employment, but multiple sources have confirmed to CBC that Hume's office was at the Saint John Regional Correctional Centre, where she was responsible for the care of inmates.

In April, the discipline committee of the Nurses Association found Hume demonstrated incompetence, professional misconduct and disregard for the safety and welfare of patients.

Questions about jail care

The provision of health care to inmates at Saint John Regional Correctional Centre has been in the spotlight in recent years. 

A statement on the Nurses Association of New Brunswick website says Hume has been under suspension since August 2018 while the disciplinary committee reviewed the case.

The association does not give any details about the complaint that led to the review.  

Hume could not be reached Friday for comment. 

A CBC investigation has raised serious questions about events surrounding the March 2011 death of Jeffrey Ryan of Pocologan, who was under care at the correctional centre.

Ryan, 37, died in the medical cell there on March 8 of that year.

He'd been admitted three days earlier for failing to comply with the conditions of an undertaking.

During his time behind bars, Ryan became increasingly ill, suffering opioid withdrawal.

Wasn't taken to hospital

At one point he collapsed in a hallway, triggering a medical code. He was seen by nursing staff but rather than being taken to hospital he was placed in a medical cell.

He was found dead hours later, his body stiff with rigor mortis.

In November 2017, inmate Mathew Hudson said in an interview that he tried to extract a molar on his own after spending four months in "severe pain" at the jail.

Hudson said he requested and was denied dental care multiple times even though the molar had fractured top to bottom.

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Connell Smith is a reporter with CBC in Saint John. He can be reached at 632-7726 Connell.smith@cbc.ca

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