New Brunswick

CFB Gagetown soldier hoping new government will solve real estate mess

A soldier stationed at CFB Gagetown is hoping to see progress in 2016 in a class action lawsuit over a financial bath he took when selling a house in Alberta. Master Warrant Officer Neil Dodsworth and others in the military say the federal government should compensate them for such losses.

Soldier took a $72K loss selling his Alberta home, now in a class-action lawsuit

Master Warrant Officer Neil Dodsworth is part of a class-action lawsuit against the Treasury Board over a loss he took selling his home in Alberta to move east. (CBC)

A soldier stationed at CFB Gagetown is hoping to see progress in 2016 in a class action lawsuit over a financial bath he took when selling a house in Alberta.

Neil Dodsworth and others in the military say the federal government should compensate them for such losses.

Dodsworth has been with the Canadian Armed Forces for more than 34 years, stationed in Petawawa, Kingston, Edmonton, and in Germany.

Dodsworth's Edmonton-area home finally sold, but at a huge loss for the family. (Neil Dodsworth)
Dodsworth says all that moving came with a cost to him and his family — but it was worth it, until he tried to move his family from Morinville, Alberta to CFB Kingston.

That cost was $72,000.

"It wasn't selling," said Dodsworth. "In fact the market kind of nose-dived on us. So the price we paid for it was not even close to what we could sell it for."

Dodsworth believes the federal government should cover his $72,000 loss.

But he believes the Treasury Board of Canada unfairly zoned his home, devaluing it and leaving him with the huge loss. 

Dodsworth, centre, has been with the Armed Forces for 34 years. (Neil Dodsworth)
"They blanketed all these towns as the Edmonton Greater Area, but Edmonton Greater Area was not having a depressed market," he said.

With the change of government Dodsworth and other soldiers in his situation are making a new push for their case to be examined and families be compensated.

The Treasury Board has told CBC it will not comment on a case before the courts.

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