New Brunswick

McAdam earthquakes have subsided says Mayor Frank Carroll

The mayor of McAdam is expecting official data from Earthquakes Canada later this week, but said the recent swarm of quakes in the region has subsided.

The swarm of earthquakes was enough to prompt Natural Resources Canada to send two seismologists from Ottawa

A window was cracked at Lindsey Wilson's McAdam home during a recent earthquake. (CBC)

The mayor of McAdam is expecting official data from Earthquakes Canada later this week, but said the recent swarm of quakes in the region has subsided.

The village has been shaken by dozens of earthquakes in the past month. Some of them measured at a 3.3 magnitude, which was strong enough to crack windows.

Mayor Frank Carroll says the village has been relatively quiet for the last week and a half, though there are still some rumblings. The Earthquakes Canada website lists the last felt quake on Feb. 24.

The swarm of earthquakes was enough to prompt Natural Resources Canada to send two seismologists from Ottawa to set up measuring equipment and study the data they collect.

Carroll is expecting to get more data from the seismographs this week.

This seismometer is one of 4 installed in and around the village of McAdam. (CBC)

"Whether they can determine that there is something closer in the area than what we realize does exist or whether it is just an earthquake swarm," he said.

"Some communities have these fairly regular basis so we understand that there are other areas in both Canada and U.S. that do get earthquake swarms."

McAdam had a similar swarm in earthquakes in 2012. In the last 30 days, according to Earthquakes Canada's website, there have been 66 tremors measured in or near the village. Natural Resources Canada plans to keep the four seismometers in McAdam for at least a few months.

Carroll is looking forward to an update on the swarm.

"I don't believe there's that much known about them that do get earthquake swarms so whether they'll be able to, from the equipment give us any more information," he said.

It's been three weeks since the last update from Earthquakes Canada.

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